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Jeremiah notes

Page history last edited by PBworks 14 years, 5 months ago

Madame Bovary

 

Transportation used between pages 0-100 

 

 

One-horse shay (p.30) (used by visitors to travel to Charles and Emma wedding)

  • opened wheeled vehicle that was American adaptation of French chaise
  • hung by leather braces from a pair of square wooden springs attached to the shafts

 

 Part 1 Ch.4

The invited guests arrived early in a variety of vehicles-- one-horse shays, two-wheeled charabancs, old gigs without tops, vans with leather curtains; and the young men from the nearest villages came in farm-carts, standing one behind the other along the sides and grasping the rails to keep from being thrown, for the horses trotted briskly and the roads were rough. They came as far as twenty-five miles away, from Goderville, from Normanville, from Cany.

(Charles and Emma wedding.)

(p.30)

 

 

 

Stagecoach (p.11)

 

Part 1 Ch.1

To save him money, his mother sent him a roast of veal each week by the stagecoach, and off this he lunched when he came in from the hospital, warming his feet by beating against the wall.

(p.11) 

 

 

 

Tilbury (p.38)

  • light, open, two-wheeled carriage with or without a top
  • cost?
  • large wheels that move fast over rough roads
  • fast, light, sportsy, and dangerous
  • spindle backed seat with curved padded backrest

 

Part 1 Ch. 5 

And her husband, knowing that she liked to go for drives, bought a second-hand two wheeled buggy. With new lamps and quilted leather mudguards it looked almost like a tilbury.

(p.38)

 

 

 

Two/Four wheeled charabancs (p.30) (used by visitors that traveled to Charles and Emma wedding)

  • cost = ?
  • horse drawn vehicle or motor coach
  • usually open topped
  • long, light, two or four wheeled, wagonette-like carriage
  • several rows of benched seats (plenty of room)
  • no roof
  • carries large groups of people
  • very popular

 

Part 1 Ch.4

The invited guests arrived early in a variety of vehicles-- one-horse shays, two-wheeled charabancs, old gigs without tops, vans with leather curtains; and the young men from the nearest villages came in farm-carts, standing one behind the other along the sides and grasping the rails to keep from being thrown, for the horses trotted briskly and the roads were rough. They came as far as twenty-five miles away, from Goderville, from Normanville, from Cany.

(Charles and Emma wedding.)

(p.30)

 

 

 

Old gigs w/out tops (p.30) (used by visitors that traveled to Charles and Emma wedding)

  • light, two-wheeled sprung cart pulled by one horse
  • more formal than a village cart and meadowbrook cart
  • sometimes used for carriage racing

 

Part 1 Ch.4

The invited guests arrived early in a variety of vehicles-- one-horse shays, two-wheeled charabancs, old gigs without tops, vans with leather curtains; and the young men from the nearest villages came in farm-carts, standing one behind the other along the sides and grasping the rails to keep from being thrown, for the horses trotted briskly and the roads were rough. They came as far as twenty-five miles away, from Goderville, from Normanville, from Cany.

(Charles and Emma wedding.)

(p.30)

 

 

 

 Second-hand two wheeled buggy (p.38) (transportation sometimes used by Charles instead of riding by horseback)

  • light two person carriage
  • cart pulled by one or two horses
  • also called roadster
  • cost= 25-30 Francs
  • looks like tilbury

 

Part 1 Ch. 5 

And her husband, knowing that she liked to go for drives, bought a second-hand two wheeled buggy. With new lamps and quilted leather mudguards it looked almost like a tilbury.

(p.38)

 

Part 1 Ch.7

One Wednesday at three in the afternoon, therefore, Monsieur and Madame Boovary set out in their buggy for La Vaubyessard, a large trunk tied on behind and a hatbox in front. Charles had another box between his legs.

They arrived at nightfall, just as lanterns were being lit in the grounds to illuminate the driveway.

(Charles drove buggy from Tostes to La Vaubysessard.)

(p.54)

 

Part 1 Ch.8

Charles's buggy drew up before the middle door; servants appeared, then the marquis, who gave the doctor's wife his arm and led her into the entrance hall.

(Charles arrived at La Vaubyessard.)

(p.55-56)

 

Part 1 Ch.8

The slack reins slapped against his  rump and grew wet with lather; and the case tied on behind thumped heavily and regularly against the body of the buggy.

(p.64)

 

Other Terms

 

Horseback (Charles rides on a single horse throughout the first part of the book)

 

Farm-cart (p.30) (used by visitors that traveled to Charles and Emma wedding)

 

Vans with leather curtains (p.30) (used by visitors that traveled to Charles and Emma wedding)

 

On foot or walking

 

Hirondelle(p.89)

 

mill-horse (p.11)

 

horse

 

cart-horses

 

carriages

 

white mare

 

black horse

 

coach

 

Trips

 

Trips by Charles (trips by Charles were on horseback or by buggy)

Tostes to Les Bertaux-15miles on horseback

Tostes to La Vaubyessbard- 3afternoon to nightfall by buggy

Tostes to Rouen-?  on horseback

Rouen to Yonville-20 miles on horseback

Other Trips

Normanville, Goderville, Cany to Les Bertaux- as far as 25miles away (some of the visitors that came to the wedding took these trip)

 

References

 

www.wikipedia.org (for more information on other types of carriage transportation and some pictures)

britannica.com

http://genealogytrails.com/main/stagecoaches.html

google images (to find pictures of carriage transportation used in Madame Bovary)

www.scienceandsociety.co.uk/results.asp

www.georgianindex.net/horse_and_carriage/carriages.html

 

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